Category Archives: Content Marketing

The ‘Spoiler Effect’ and How It Can Transform Your Content

I love “Game of Thrones,” “Breaking Bad” and “The Walking Dead.” At a glance these series seem to have absolutely nothing in common, but they do have one common denominator: they have the “spoiler effect.”

I’ve been seeing the “S” word everywhere lately, especially with the fourth season of “Game of Thrones” now at full speed. Every website you visit, radio station you tune into and tweet you see contains some sort of clause warning: “Spoilers ahead! Do not continue if you have not watched yet!” The fear that someone will stumble upon a juicy online review or overhear a spoiler-filled conversation has become a very real one. We’ve all probably seen irate fans share rants on social media about how people need to respect the fact that others haven’t caught up yet. This still happens even for “Breaking Bad”—whose series finale aired last September.

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Maxwell House Proves the Importance of Never Resting on One’s Laurels

Coffee lovers around the world are certainly familiar with Maxwell House, and though it’s not my personal favorite coffee—I’m looking at you, Peet’s—I’ve certainly gotten through many-a morning sipping it. Though a household name, Maxwell House decided to cut its advertising budget to $7.8 million last year, a substantial decrease from the $38.4 million the Kraft Foods-owned company spent in 2010.

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But the company apparently learned a lesson quickly: In marketing, you can never rest on your laurels and must always strive to push the envelope and continue to be aggressive. Having seemingly learned its lesson, Maxwell House recently announced that it plans to spend between $20 million and $25 million on its marketing efforts this year. What’s more, the company has high hopes for its investment as it plans to “grow [the advertising budget] through growing sales, reinvesting it back in the business,” according to Chris McClement, senior director for Maxwell House.

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If Jack White can Produce an Album in One Day, You can Get Your Blog Moving Too

Fans of Grammy award-winning artist Jack White certainly know the man is prolific. White, who burst onto the music scene as the guitarist for the White Stripes back in 1999, is also known for his work with the Raconteurs and the Dead Weather. Now, White is launching a solo music career as well—and he is out to prove something else in the process: his creative speed.

Jack_White_OttawaOn April 19, White will attempt to set the world record for the fastest recorded album ever. Sources indicate that White plans to record and release the title track of his album all in one day. In order to accomplish this, the song will be performed and transferred directly to acetate right in his Nashville, Tenn. studio, Third Man Records. Then, the tapes will be immediately sent down the road to United Record Pressing where they will be turned into 45s. The records will then be rushed back and will go on sale later in the day at Third Man.

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Give Your Content Marketing Strategy its ‘One Shining Moment’

Tonight’s the night—the NCAA championship game where either a No. 7 or 8 seed will walk away with the national title. This past Saturday night we watched a riveting game between UConn and Florida and witnessed Kentucky win yet another thriller, this time besting Wisconsin by a point. Now it all comes to a head tonight when UConn and Kentucky will go head to head for the title.

After the winner is declared, however, another March Madness tradition will take place: “One Shining Moment.” The song is annually played as the winning team’s players cut down the nets to a Montage of highlights and best plays from the tournament (watch last year’s “One Shining Moment” video below). There are some interesting gems that can be extracted from this video. Ready to take some post-March Madness inspiration and apply it to your company’s content marketing strategy?

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What Marketers Can Learn from the Wu-Tang Clan

Many of those who are familiar with the Wu-Tang Clan might not know much about what they are, but certainly know what they ain’t. But now, listeners can add the moniker “ingenious marketers” to the list of phrases that could be used to describe the hip hop collective.

WuTangClanThe New York City-based rap group recently announced that it will sell only one copy of its “secret album,” tentatively titled “The Wu—Once Upon a Time in Shaolin.” Before that copy ultimately ends up in the hands of a collector—who will either hoard the music or share it with the world—fans will be able to hit “tour dates” across the country and fork over $50 to hear the 128-minute album’s 31 tracks. Continue reading →

Lame or Legit: Twitter Adds Photo Tagging

Warning: I might go on a rant during this post.

I’m still deciding whether I should like the fact that Twitter is launching a photo tagging feature or cringe because of it. I have been a Twitter user for less time than other popular social sites, but I am quickly turning into a Twitter-aholic for a few reasons—photo tagging not being one of them.

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What We Can Take Away from Facebook’s Oculus Rift Purchase

Right now, all the focus in the marketing world is on mobility, as the number of smartphones in use topped 1.4 billion in 2014. But everyone wants to know: What will come after mobile? This week, Facebook gave a strong indication of what’s coming down the pike next when it announced it acquired the Irvine, Calif.-based company Oculus Rift for $2 billion.

Oculus Rift, which makes an advanced virtual reality headset, is being hailed as the next major solution in the tech industry for its ability to literally transport users directly into a three-dimensionally rendered environment. Instead of staring at a screen, in other words, a user can be completely surrounded by it.

13013107993_9f0de59bcb_oRight now, Oculus Rift is primarily a video game platform. But according to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, the platform has the potential to do a lot more than entertain. As Zuckerberg explained recently, Oculus Rift will transform the way that people learn, experience entertainment and communicate in the future.

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Tipoff is Here: Do You Have What it Takes to Play till the Buzzer Sounds?

shutterstock_90617275With the play-in-games behind us and all 68 bracket spots filled up, now the fun really begins.

Today, 16 teams take to the court to inch one step closer to the Sweet 16, and millions upon millions of fans from across the country figure out a way to squeeze in pressing work meetings with live streaming from their desks. (Did you know the groundswell of excitement surrounding college basketball and brackets costs $1.2 billion for every unproductive hour at work?)

March Madness is officially here and every company can actually learn a thing or two from the tournament about best practices and corporate mindset.

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Yes, 311 is Still Around, Their New Album is Great & Their Marketing Strategy is Even Better

These days, unless you’re Justin Bieber, Miley Cyrus or Lady Gaga, odds are you’re not going to sell a lot of records. Whereas the Backstreet Boys sold 9.4 million copies of Millennium in 1999—the most of any artists that year—Justin Timberlake topped the charts in 2013, selling 2.4 million copies of The 20/20 Experience.

311_AustinKeep in mind that those numbers represent the highest-selling albums of the entire year. One can only imagine how many copies the average album sold.

Musicians used to depend on album sales to support their livelihood, but in the age of the Internet and easy digitally sharing, it is reasonable to conclude that people are simple sharing (read: stealing) music from these artists rather than buying albums. Because of this, musicians are increasingly depending on their live act to serve as their main source of income. Continue reading →

Content Marketing Got Us to the Moon. What Can It Do for Your Brand?

If someone were to ask you how the U.S. first landed on the moon, your first response would probably be “in a rocket ship.” But did you know that it was actually content marketing that drummed up enough support from the American public to actually drive the initial lunar mission in the first place?

As “Marketing the Moon: The Selling of the Apollo Lunar Program” co-author David Meerman Scott explained in a recent Forbes interview, when President Kennedy first challenged the U.S. to put a man on the moon by the end of the decade in 1961, he faced an awesome task.

8252445373_73e38a057d_z“Imagine convincing the American public to spend as much as four percent of the national budget in some years, to send twelve people to the surface of the moon,” Scott said. “It was a crazy thing to do and marketing got us there.”

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