Me, Me, Me – Abandon the Kindergartner in You

We all have that person in our life. That dear friend who we don’t see for weeks and who—during your once a month dinner catch-up—rehashes every insignificant detail about his or her latest job catastrophe, spousal and/or child predicament and vacation to Bora Bora. We get it; you are busy and you have a lot to talk about.

kindegartenerThe thing is, the “me, me, me” complex loses its cuteness at about the age of six.  Because the truth is, we are all busy adults—busy adults with our own celebrations, challenges and confusions—and we now see much more quickly through those individuals who so easily forget to ask, “And how was your day?”

Just as your friends and family don’t want to constantly hear about your life, your predicaments and your milestones, your target market doesn’t always want to hear about how great you are. In fact, they definitely don’t.

Think about your favorite brand. Chances are, you don’t love the company for its narcissistic, holier than thou attitude. Conversely, you probably respect the brand for its innovation, its stellar customer service and its awareness that more exists in this world than just the brand. You love when it posts memorable images and posts on social media, weaving corporate beliefs to current events (think Coca Cola on Earth Day); you respect how it asks for your input about upcoming company decisions (like when Vitamin Water asked consumers to choose the next flavor); and you admire its versatility on the print, digital and social fronts.

However, for many of us marketers out there, the ubiquity of content marketing has awakened the six-year-old child in all of us. The world is suddenly yet again Barbies and Legos—and we can’t wait to share with our audience that we constructed the coolest new building or found a unique outfit for Barbie.

Content marketing has opened the door for brands to tell their story through the creation of custom, tailored copy. Blogs, newsfeeds and corporate subsites have been popping up at a rapid pace so that companies can elucidate on their latest offerings and promote their subject matter expertise. In fact, 60 percent of companies manage a blog, and are taking great strides towards establishing themselves as thought leaders in their respected spaces.

So how do you create a blog or microsite worthy of your customers’ traffic and engagement? By tapping into the adult in you… not the six-year-old.

Encourage your marketing team to produce a wide mix of news—from industry stories to company-specific postings. Are you in the retail space? Consider writing an article about how the spending habits of families have changed as of late and how retailers address the evolving needs of consumers. Are you a burgeoning tech company in the VoIP sector? Perhaps you can put together an article about the top three benefits of VoIP technology—without ever mentioning your company name.

Your ability to be a thought leader and subject matter advocate is just as important as your desire to share your corporate message.

We all have that inner kindergartner in us whining to keep our blog 100 percent company-centric—convinced that your target audience is dying to know about your every product offering, company expansion and corporate milestone.

But, your job as a marketer is to silence that childish energy.

Because much as you wouldn’t do business with a six-year-old, neither will your target market.

One response

  1. […] when they read your company blog or comb your social media sites and see a flagrant spread of “me, me and me.” You are touting your accomplishments, delighting in your newest partnership and extolling in […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: